Eric Pulier is one of the more well known faces in Silicon Valley, but that doesn’t mean that he is a house hold name throughout the world just yet. Pulier made his name through the world of venture capitalism, philanthropy, and so much more. Today we are going to highlight a few facets of Pulier’s wide and varied rise through a business that is dominated by typically so few.

 

To really get an appreciation for what Pulier has accomplished in the business world we would have to go back to a time where he wasn’t a part of that world. Pulier went to Harvard in his university years where he studied journalism and focused intently on making a name for himself with his writing. Pulier wrote for the Harvard Crimson where his wit would constantly be leaking through the pages. Pulier would end up graduating from Harvard with a Bachelor of Arts in both English and American Literature — Magna Cum Laude. Since graduation it has been Pulier’s focus to improve the lives of those around him and we can pretty safely say that he’s accomplished that task.

 

Eric Pulier moved to Los Angeles and thus into the rapidly growing tech world. Since his turn to the business Pulier has been a co-founder or sole founder of 15 different companies. Along the way Pulier has raised hundreds of millions of dollars for companies that he has worked with, firmly establishing himself for his good ideas, business acumen , and his ability to bridge the gap between the two in a cold-cut business world. Some of his most notable companies include digital Digital Evolution, SOA Software, Desktone, and US Media Interactive LLC. See: https://www.crunchbase.com/person/eric-pulier

 

Perhaps above all of these other decorations, Pulier is most proud of his philanthropic tilt in recent years. Pulier is a board member on the XPrize Foundation. The XPrize Foundation is focused on pulling together people with great ideas and rewarding them for bringing those ideas to fruition. Pulier has also been a part of foundations that focus on improving childhood diabetes and dealing with research for the difficult disease, multiple sclerosis.